Skip to main content

Run a persistent baking node

Want to make your baking infrastructure more resilient to electricity and internet cut-offs? Let's use Linux service files to keep those Tezos binaries running.

The following tutorial deep dives into the subject and shows how to create persistent Tezos services.

caution

The current Octez version is v14.0 and the protocol version is Kathmandu.

Running Tezos binaries as services

One advantage of setting up the node and baker daemons as services is that it can automatically relaunch the daemons if they stop working, or when the machine restarts. No additional action is needed from the user side.

(Note that systems relying on a Ledger hardware wallet will need to have the PIN input again after a power failure. In these cases only using a UPS can ensure a truly persistent system.)

Systemd is a set of system software components necessary for Linux operation. In particular, it exposes a set of daemons: systemd, journald, networkd, and logind. For each system, a set of utilities and commands are available to the user like systemctl, journalctl, loginctl, etc. In our case, we will take advantage of this powerful Linux tool to build Tezos binaries that keep running over time.

Pre-requisites: Install and compile the Tezos Octez suite from scratch (the same approach works with Ubuntu PPA installation, but the .service files need to be adapted). It is also possible to use service files otherwise, but we will only cover the From scratch approach in this tutorial.

caution

The baking and accuser daemon versions are currently 014-PtKathma in the .service files, but you may need to change them with the right version.

Creation of the Octez Tezos node service

Create the following file (named tezos-node.service) in /etc/systemd/system/.

# The Tezos Node service (part of systemd)
# file: /etc/systemd/system/tezos-node.service

[Unit]
Description = Tezos Node Service
Documentation = http://tezos.gitlab.io/
Wants = network-online.target
After = network-online.target

[Service]
User = <user>
Group = <user>
WorkingDirectory= /home/<user>/tezos/
ExecStart = /home/<user>/tezos/tezos-node run --rpc-addr 127.0.0.1:8732 --data-dir ~/.tezos-node
Restart = on-failure

[Install]
WantedBy = multi-user.target
RequiredBy = tezos-baker.service tezos-accuser.service

Creation of the baker service

Create the following file (named tezos-baker.service) in /etc/systemd/system/.

caution

Don't forget to import your baking key on the tezos-client with: tezos-client import secret key baker_alias <path_to_baker_secret_key> (compatible with clear, encrypted and HSM key).

caution

Since the Jakarta amendment, the --liquidity-baking-toggle-vote <vote> command line switch becomes now mandatory. <vote> should be replaced by on,off or pass.

# The Tezos Baker service (part of systemd)
# file: /etc/systemd/system/tezos-baker.service

[Unit]
Description = Tezos baker Service
Documentation = http://tezos.gitlab.io/
Wants = network-online.target
Requires = tezos-node.service

[Service]
User = <user>
Group = <user>
Environment = "TEZOS_LOG=* -> debug"
WorkingDirectory= /home/<user>/tezos/
ExecStart = /home/<user>/tezos/tezos-baker-014-PtKathma --endpoint http://127.0.0.1:8732 run with local node /home/<user>/.tezos-node --liquidity-baking-toggle-vote <vote>
Restart = on-failure

[Install]
WantedBy = multi-user.target

Creation of the accuser service

Create the following file (named tezos-accuser.service) in /etc/systemd/system/.

# The Tezos Accuser service (part of systemd)
# file: /etc/systemd/system/tezos-accuser.service

[Unit]
Description = Tezos accuser Service
Documentation = http://tezos.gitlab.io/
Wants = network-online.target
Requires = tezos-node.service

[Service]
User = <user>
Group = <user>
WorkingDirectory= /home/<user>/tezos/
ExecStart = /home/<user>/tezos/tezos-accuser-014-PtKathma --endpoint http://127.0.0.1:8732 run
Restart = on-failure

[Install]
WantedBy = multi-user.target

Enable and start service files

Once tezos-node.service, tezos-baker.service, and tezos-accuser.service are created, continue with these steps:

  1. Enable the services using: sudo systemctl enable tezos-node.service tezos-baker.service tezos-accuser.service

  2. Finally, start the services using: sudo systemctl start tezos-node.service tezos-baker.service tezos-accuser.service

Useful commands

Monitor your services

sudo systemctl status tezos-node.service tezos-baker.service tezos-accuser.service

Stop your services

sudo systemctl stop tezos-node.service tezos-baker.service tezos-accuser.service

Reload or restart a service

sudo systemctl reload-or-restart tezos-*.service (* being node, baker or accuser)

Displaying service logs

When launching node, baker, and accuser services, we ideally want to be able to leanly monitor the behaviour of the daemons by keeping track of their logs. Using services has the advantage of being able to rely on journalctl to handle and organize logs for you - including rotating logs so that they don't take a lot of space (verbose modes can get large quite quickly).

Moreover, journalctl support querying and exporting concrete snapshots of the logs. Here follow a few examples on how to use --since and --until to refine the logs around particular time windows.

Follow live the logs of the node/baker/accuser services

journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-node.service journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-baker.service journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-accuser.service

tip

You might want to run each of them on separate terminal windows (and defining a handy aliases for them).

Export node logs since yesterday

journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-node.service --since yesterday

Export baker logs since 8 am today

journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-baker.service --since 08:00

Export node logs since a week ago until one hour ago

journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-node.service --since "1 week ago" --until "1 hour ago"

Export baker logs between two specific timestamps

journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-baker.service --since "2022-05-09 00:00:00" --until "2022-05-09 00:00:02"

Export interleaved node/baker/accuser logs around a specific window

journalctl --follow --unit=tezos-*.service --since "2 minutes ago" --until "60 seconds ago"

tip

This command is good for debugging connection issues between node and baker.

Running a remote signer as a service

To secure their baking infrastructure, some bakers use a remote signer. This setup consists in:

  • Running the node and baker on a first machine, e.g. a remote node running on a VPS in the cloud.

  • Storing the key on a second machine, typically a local system (perhaps using a Ledger/HSM), and running a signing daemon to perform signing operations requested by the remote node running on the first machine.

Setup a remote signer using a .service file

Prerequisites:

First make sure you have setup a remote machine on which your node will be running, and a "home" machine on which your baking keys will be stored (or that is connected to a Ledger/HSM).

Setup the remote signer following the procedure here.

On the home machine, create and launch the following service:

# The Tezos Signer service (part of systemd)
# file: /etc/systemd/system/tezos-signer.service

[Unit]
Description = Tezos Signer Service
Documentation = http://tezos.gitlab.io/
Wants = network-online.target
Requires = tezos-node.service

[Service]
User = <user>
Group = <user>
WorkingDirectory= /home/<user>/tezos/
ExecStart = /home/<user>/tezos/tezos-signer launch http signer
Restart = on-failure

[Install]
WantedBy = multi-user.target

To launch your signing service, follow the same steps as in the "Enable and start service files" section above.

Happy (Steady) Baking!